Livelihood Saving Animal Treatment

Livestock play an important economic, social and cultural function for the pastoralist community in Galmudug State, Somalia. They sustain the wellbeing of the households and loss of these productive assets severely affect the household food security and  nutrition. Drought, destruction of pasture by the desert locust, and lack of quality veterinary services in the region have negatively affected livestock production leading to reduction of sizes of herds and livestock produce in the region.

NAPAD has partnered with Somalia Humanitarian Fund (SHF) to treat 27,863 animals owned by 900HHs who live in villages of Shilamadow, Darasalam, Dafle, Wanagsan, Gesweyne and Barwaqo in Abudwak district. 20 Community Animal Health Workers (CAHW) received training on how to conduct animal treatment. These community resource people were also provided with veterinary drugs and vitamins required to offer their services to the community. The treatment exercise involved, administering antibiotics to treat common diseases such as pneumonia and sheep and goat pox, deworming, hoof trimming and provision of multivitamins to the weak animals.



Community Animal Health workers conducting animal treatment

The treatment exercise came in at the right time when there was an outbreak of serious Pneumonia among animals Approximately 30 of my 54 shoats were sick before the treatment, I had no money to purchase drugs we never have access to veterinary services from the government. All my sick and weak animals have now received treatment through NAPAD and they are healthy. I am grateful to NAPAD for this livestock treatment campaign. Reports Nasri Abdi, one of the beneficiaries for the livestock treatment from Shilmadow village


Nasri observes as her shoats receive treatment

Nasri further reported that “the body condition of her animals has improved after the treatment, which now would fetch beter prices and also increased milk production for both family use and selling. My appeal to NAPAD is to increase the number of animals to be treated per household and the number of beneficiaries to cover more households who require help, next time they undertake such noble activity”

The communities appreciate livestock health interventions conducted by NAPAD organization as they were on the verge of losing their animals due to various illnesses. Such interventions are infrequent, and when they happen to take place, they cover a very small portion of their livestock compared to the needs on the ground. The community leaders, therefore, requested that such intervention be broadened to reach a greater population.

Solar Energy Improves Food Security of Pastoralists in Abudwak

Dalsan, a village roughly 20km from Abudwak town, hosts 400 households who rely on a diesel-powered generator. The high cost of running the generator and regularly breakdown forced the Dalsan community to turn to unsafe water sources such as water ponds.

“Getting water was our main challenge, and when the generator broke down, which was the norm, we would buy water from the town at exorbitant prices. Those who could not afford to buy water resorted to fetching water from the dirty ponds”, reports Abdi Hassan Ali, a father of 7 children and the community leader of Dalsan Village.

Solar panels installed to power water pumping at the Dalsan Borehole.

It’s under these conditions that Nomadic Assistance for Peace and Development (NAPAD) with funding from Somali Humanitarian Fund (SHF) intervened in Dalsan village with a project whose objective was improving food security by providing a hybrid solar water pumping system that would increase water for livestock use as well as diversification into vegetable production through kitchen gardening.

Now this solar has closed that gap and made access to water easier with fewer worries about fuel costs, and whether or not the generator will break down. The solar pumps the water, and we fill the elevated tank, and it’s sufficient”, Reports Abdi Hassan Ali.


The solar-powered water pumping system has increased the output of water from the borehole by 50%. With this increase, NAPAD conducted a 3-day training for 50 women-headed households on kitchen gardening. The project then provided farm inputs in the form of various vegetable seeds and farming equipment to support them start their Kitchen-gardens.

NAPAD agronomist monitor kitchen gardens

“We are grateful for the kitchen garden, with no shortage of water I can engage in other productive activities for the betterment of family and give time to my kitchen garden”, says Zainab, a resident of Dalsan Village and a mother of 5 where she now grows Kale, spinach, capsicum, hot pepper and watermelon, and she plans to expand the garden to cater for local market demand

LIVESTOCK FOR LIVELIHOODS: Increasing Household Income for Pastoralists in Gedo Somalia

Sahara Adan having her goat treated in Deka village Gedo

Deka Village, Elwak district in Gedo Somalia has been the home of 38-year-old Sahara Adan Dhicis for the past 8 years. A widow and the sole breadwinner for her 8 children, Sahara relies on her small herd as the only source of income for her household. For residents of Deka village, wealth has always been measured by the size of one’s herd, their livestock is a crucial source of food (milk) and a mobile bank that can be converted into cash for health expenses, school fees, etc.

A herd of goats in Deka village

For years drought and animal ailments have been the worst mishaps that could manifest to this community. “It was so distressing, watching as our animals die and there was nothing we could do about the diseases. We could barely get any milk for the children,“ Sahara reflects. Diseases not only claimed the lives of animals but also undermined their productivity, resulting in less milk and meat and also lowering their market prices.

“When our livestock got sick we would give them medicine by guessing the diseases they were suffering from and most times it would worsen the condition because we would give them wrong treatment or misuse the drug quantity, “Says Sahara

Lack of animal health services in the region has crippled the efforts of increasing productivity of pastoralists livestock and more so for the vulnerable households such as IDPs. To intervene in this dire situation,  NAPAD together with the German Federal Foreign Office (GFFO) and Medico International has trained and equipped 15 Community Health Workers with skills to diagnose and treat livestock diseases. The project seeks to reduce livestock morbidity, thereby improving productivity for household consumption and household income. This intervention has seen 450 households being provided with veterinary care of 28,000 animals.

Animal treatment activity with trained Community Health Workers

My children now drink more milk.

Sahara adan

“My animals were treated during the free treatment drive in our village. The animals were given treatment for worms, pneumonia, and parasites. Our animals are now healthy and thriving despite it being the rainy season when diseases are quite rampant. My children now drink more milk,” says a beaming Sahara. “I thank NAPAD for the support they have given our community”.