Water is now Accessible in Dayax


Solar panel installed to pump water from the shallow well to the water kiosk

Dayax Village is a village located 12 km from Dollow and 2.5 km to the river Dawa. For the Dayax village residents, accessing clean and affordable water has been a problem for generations.  Women and children have had a hard time traveling many kilometers a day in search of water. The only water source a shallow well was in a dilapidated state due to damages by floods. The residents struggled to access water due to lack of any other water sources for domestic use and their livestock. The community was left in limbo years ago after the main diesel engine used to pump water developed a technical problem and was not repaired due to financial problems.


Nima Muhamud collecting water from the water kiosk

Nima Mohamud, mother of two recalls how the water situation was dire before NAPAD’s intervention. Nima and her fellow women experienced many challenges to quench their families’ thirst daily. In groups, women used to trek roughly 5 kilometers to and from river Dawa, twice a day as a daily routine to fetch water for their families.

Early in the morning I will go to the river in the company of other women equipped with my Jerri cans, fetch water for my family. We traveled for one hour to and from the river”. Nima narrates.

The tiresome journey of fetching water was worsened by insecurity especially for the young girls as it was not safe to go collect water on their own. Wild animals such as crocodiles also posed a threat for those fetching water in the river. 


Young girls from Dayax Village comfortably collecting water from the new water kiosk

To help resolve these problems, NAPAD with funding from Norwegian Church Aid- through the ‘Drought Resilience Program’, implemented a WASH project that has now enabled residents of this village to access clean, safe, and affordable water within at least 500m from their homesteads. 

The newly constructed water kiosk

The intervention comprised of the rehabilitation of Dayax shallow well near the river Dawa which was achieved through Cash for Work, the establishment of a hybrid solar water pumping system, rehabilitation of water pipework from the shallow well to the water kiosk, and the construction of a water kiosk in village.


Rehabilitated Dayax village Shallow well

It has been three months since the Dayax village residents started enjoying clean, safe, and affordable water. The water kiosk is now strategically built about 500 meters away from the homesteads to reduce the distance walked to and from the village. The water kiosk is also fitted with 8 taps and serves eight people at once and is serving approximately 1500 residents of  Dayax village.

The whole village is a few minutes away from the kiosk, we access the water anytime and at any moment. From morning to evening and even night.  Previously, the water we fetch was never enough but now plenty…On behalf of the village, want to thank NAPAD for establishing this important project for us. We say thank you NAPAD and the donors who made this project possible’’.  appreciated Nima. 

Livelihood Saving Animal Treatment

Livestock play an important economic, social and cultural function for the pastoralist community in Galmudug State, Somalia. They sustain the wellbeing of the households and loss of these productive assets severely affect the household food security and  nutrition. Drought, destruction of pasture by the desert locust, and lack of quality veterinary services in the region have negatively affected livestock production leading to reduction of sizes of herds and livestock produce in the region.

NAPAD has partnered with Somalia Humanitarian Fund (SHF) to treat 27,863 animals owned by 900HHs who live in villages of Shilamadow, Darasalam, Dafle, Wanagsan, Gesweyne and Barwaqo in Abudwak district. 20 Community Animal Health Workers (CAHW) received training on how to conduct animal treatment. These community resource people were also provided with veterinary drugs and vitamins required to offer their services to the community. The treatment exercise involved, administering antibiotics to treat common diseases such as pneumonia and sheep and goat pox, deworming, hoof trimming and provision of multivitamins to the weak animals.



Community Animal Health workers conducting animal treatment

The treatment exercise came in at the right time when there was an outbreak of serious Pneumonia among animals Approximately 30 of my 54 shoats were sick before the treatment, I had no money to purchase drugs we never have access to veterinary services from the government. All my sick and weak animals have now received treatment through NAPAD and they are healthy. I am grateful to NAPAD for this livestock treatment campaign. Reports Nasri Abdi, one of the beneficiaries for the livestock treatment from Shilmadow village


Nasri observes as her shoats receive treatment

Nasri further reported that “the body condition of her animals has improved after the treatment, which now would fetch beter prices and also increased milk production for both family use and selling. My appeal to NAPAD is to increase the number of animals to be treated per household and the number of beneficiaries to cover more households who require help, next time they undertake such noble activity”

The communities appreciate livestock health interventions conducted by NAPAD organization as they were on the verge of losing their animals due to various illnesses. Such interventions are infrequent, and when they happen to take place, they cover a very small portion of their livestock compared to the needs on the ground. The community leaders, therefore, requested that such intervention be broadened to reach a greater population.

Solar Energy Improves Food Security of Pastoralists in Abudwak

Dalsan, a village roughly 20km from Abudwak town, hosts 400 households who rely on a diesel-powered generator. The high cost of running the generator and regularly breakdown forced the Dalsan community to turn to unsafe water sources such as water ponds.

“Getting water was our main challenge, and when the generator broke down, which was the norm, we would buy water from the town at exorbitant prices. Those who could not afford to buy water resorted to fetching water from the dirty ponds”, reports Abdi Hassan Ali, a father of 7 children and the community leader of Dalsan Village.

Solar panels installed to power water pumping at the Dalsan Borehole.

It’s under these conditions that Nomadic Assistance for Peace and Development (NAPAD) with funding from Somali Humanitarian Fund (SHF) intervened in Dalsan village with a project whose objective was improving food security by providing a hybrid solar water pumping system that would increase water for livestock use as well as diversification into vegetable production through kitchen gardening.

Now this solar has closed that gap and made access to water easier with fewer worries about fuel costs, and whether or not the generator will break down. The solar pumps the water, and we fill the elevated tank, and it’s sufficient”, Reports Abdi Hassan Ali.


The solar-powered water pumping system has increased the output of water from the borehole by 50%. With this increase, NAPAD conducted a 3-day training for 50 women-headed households on kitchen gardening. The project then provided farm inputs in the form of various vegetable seeds and farming equipment to support them start their Kitchen-gardens.

NAPAD agronomist monitor kitchen gardens

“We are grateful for the kitchen garden, with no shortage of water I can engage in other productive activities for the betterment of family and give time to my kitchen garden”, says Zainab, a resident of Dalsan Village and a mother of 5 where she now grows Kale, spinach, capsicum, hot pepper and watermelon, and she plans to expand the garden to cater for local market demand

KITCHEN GARDENS DIVERSIFY DIETS FOR PASTORALISTS IN ABUDWAK

Abudwak, Galmudug state being arid and water scarce, there is a common perception that it is not suitable for farming.  Farming is the least thing discussed in many households in this remote part of the country. That notion is slowly fading away for many households after NAPAD introduced kitchen garden farming for pastoralist communities in Abudwak.

It’s 6.00 am; mama Fatuma is watering her small kitchen garden in her plot, a routine she has religiously observed for the last three months since she was introduced to kitchen gardening by NAPAD. Mama Fatuma’s 10M by 5M kitchen garden looks promising. Within a month of planting her seeds and seedlings, the plants have begun to bear fruits, first Capsicum, Tomatoes, kales, and watermelon. The excited mother of 8 can’t believe her progress and can’t help but admire her work.  Her farm will produce enough vegetables for her family use and sell them in the local market.

Now Abudwak comes to us

MAMA FATUMA
Mama Fatuma in a discussion with NAPAD agronomist

“We no longer travel to Abudwak town to get vegetables. I have plenty in my compound. We get it anytime we want. Now Abudwak comes to us’’, Reports the new farmer.  In addition to growing food for her family, Fatuma can sell some of the vegetables she grows. For example, she sells each capsicum at 10 cents Dollar. “This morning I sold two Kgs of tomatoes and 1kg of capsicum to a grocery in Abduwak town’’ says delighted Fatuma.

NAPAD, in partnership with Somalia Humanitarian Fund (SHF), is implementing a project that promotes diversification into kitchen gardens by the pastoralist community for a sustainable supply of nutritious fresh vegetables and fruits. Water for this farming is supplied by the village boreholes in Dalsan and Hulkujur villages in Abudwak district.

NAPAD through SHF funding has solarized water pumping in these boreholes, increasing their water output, reducing the cost of pumping the water, and employing sustainable renewable energy to pump the water.  The increased water output ensures that the community has enough water for domestic use, livestock use, and now for their kitchen gardening. “Before the kitchen garden farming, we used to have this belief that farming does well only where rivers flow. We have realized you can farm anywhere when water is available” says Mama Fatuma

Mama Fatuma assesses her capsicums

NAPAD, with the support of the community elders, identified 100 women from Dalsan and Hulkujur villages in Abudwak who were trained in kitchen farming.  The women were provided with farm inputs which include vegetable seeds and farm tools. Fatuma is among 100 beneficiaries of this project.  The approach seeks to diversify sources and quality of food and nutrients for vulnerable persons such as women and children. This is the first time Mama Fatuma and the other women were introduced into farming as this pastoralist community relies more on livestock production for food.

Mama Fatuma’s spinach grown in a gunny sack

Now that these women farmers have registered success in kitchen garden farming, many other women are willing to learn, so that they too can venture and replicate the success story in kitchen garden farming.   Mama Fatuma dreams to have a big farm that will supply the whole of Abudwak town. She appreciates NAPAD and their staff for introducing them to vegetable farming. “We say thank you to NAPAD and the donors for giving us this knowledge we didn’t have. May Allah bless you”.  

YOUTH AND WOMEN IN MANDERA BENEFIT FROM TRAININGS

In 2014, Fatuma Sheikh, a 30-year-old mother of four and a passionate entrepreneur, witnessed the high demand for fast-moving consumer goods (FMCGs) – relatively low-cost products and sold quickly. After seeing this unmet need, Fatuma decided to start her own small business, a small shop.

Fatuma started her business with a $150 investment from her savings but quickly ran into substantial challenges. Like many other micro-retailers lacking formal business training, Fatuma was operating her business based on intuition rather than well-established business management practices. This led to poor financial management consequently leading to losses.

Fatuma’s experience is common across Mandera County, Kenya, where women and youth, in particular, have limited access to formal employment opportunities, and entrepreneurship presents a path toward economic independence. However, like Fatuma, many of these entrepreneurs lack basic business skills and knowledge, which prevents them from maximizing their business’s economic potential. Existing enterprises of women and youth operate with minimal knowledge of business management.

Entrepreneurship training held in Lafey Mandera county for 50 women and youth.

To strengthen households’ livelihoods and resilience against external shocks through diversification of income, NAPAD, together with Terre des homes and Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (Germany) – BMZ, trained 50 women and youth on entrepreneurship skills. The ten-day training took place in Lafey sub-county Mandera County and covered the modules on business management, value addition and marketing  as well financial management  and  knowledge on how to improve  their saving  culture to improve their  business capital.

Fatuma Sheikh, a 30-year-old budding entrepreneur attending the entrepreneurship training.

Before the training, I was just in the business because I wanted to be called a businesswoman. I didn’t know how to run the business professionally. I was doing things I wanted without much consideration. I have now been taught how to balance books, marketing, saving, borrowing, and planning.” Said Fatuma . “With this new knowledge and skills, I look forward to realizing my dream of owning a supermarket.

The women and youth divided into five groups will then be supported through in-kind support to establish profitable, sustainable business enterprises. The five groups were able to select their preferred enterprises and then be supported with all the requirements needed to ensure they would thrive.

Suleiman Hirsi a 26 year old youth who wants to start the entrepreneurship journey attending the training.

26-year-old Suleiman Hirsi attended the training. “I have enjoyed and learned a lot in these ten days. I even identified business opportunities in the area that I can pursue. Our group chose to pursue a car wash business as there is none in the locality at current. NAPAD has promised to support our business idea, and we are very excited to start this entrepreneurship journey.

A class session during the ten-day training.

This training is under the Building Resilience at Community Level Project, contributing to the sustainable strengthening of the livelihood and resilience to droughts in Gedo (Somalia) and Mandera County (Kenya).